Bystrianska Cave

The limestone cave of Bystrianska Cave is spotted on the southern slopes related to Nizke Tatry Mountains found near the village of Bystra in Slovakia. E.A. Hollmann and J.Kovalcik discovered Bystrianska Cave in the year 1926, and it is a protected natural monument since 1973. The Bystrianska Cave consists mainly of dark limestone rocks that have resulted from tectonic cracks by that of water corrosion, which have been enlarged through the means of underground river Bystra.

Bystrianska Cave

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The limestone cave of Bystrianska Cave is spotted on the southern slopes related to Nizke Tatry Mountains found near the village of Bystra in Slovakia. E.A. Hollmann and J.Kovalcik discovered Bystrianska Cave in the year 1926, and it is a protected natural monument since 1973. The Bystrianska Cave consists mainly of dark limestone rocks that have resulted from tectonic cracks by that of water corrosion, which have been enlarged through the means of underground river Bystra.

The Bystrianska Cave comprises of two parts, which are but the Old as well as the New Cave, as the opening related to the Old Cave can be spotted along a steep limestone slope found in the southern sections of Bystra, as it then leads to low tunnels that come with cracks, as the connecting tunnel in the westerly section paves way for the new cave.

The New Cave unveils zigzag tunnels that come with cracks, and at places it gets converted to domes and halls. Towards the southern section lies the Pelko (Hell) that is a deep abyss, which had been discovered in 1956. The River Bystrianka is seen flowing through the lowest portions pertaining to the cave, and the sporadic presence of curtains made from stalactites, wall waterfalls, sinter cook stoves and tinkle organs can be felt at the Bystrianska Cave.